Questions About Coaching

Image courtesy of Idea go /FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of Idea go /FreeDigitalPhotos.net

 

 

 

You may have some questions about coaching.  Listed below are some answers to frequently asked questions about coaching.

If you do not find the answer to the question you might have, please contact me with your specific question and I will be happy to address it.

Who might find coaching useful?

In general, people who feel frustrated or unhappy with their current life situation and would like to make a change could find coaching useful. For example, people in transition from full time employment to retirement might ask, “What do I do now?” People who are entering “empty nest” might want to explore “things I’ve always wanted to do.” People who have experienced loss might want to move on in a positive way. People who might want a change in their appearance, such as weight loss or style update might find coaching helpful. Anyone who struggles with ADD or ADHD could benefit from working on goal setting and strategies for organizing his or her life.

Can I get some idea of how coaching works without signing a long-term agreement?

Yes. You can request a free, introductory coaching session. Then, if you decide to continue with the coaching, you can sign a contract that specifies how often and for how long you will work with the coach. You, the client, are in control. If you want to stop the coaching, you can do so. Cancelling sessions and refunds will all be addressed in your contract, so read it carefully.

How is coaching different from counseling?

First, most counseling approaches assume that the client has a problem or some issue that needs healing. Coaching assumes the client is capable and works to support the client’s ability to achieve a goal. Secondly, most therapy approaches require exploring the past. Coaching is focused on present goals and present road blocks to achieving those goals. Thirdly, counseling is focused on answering “why” something is happening. Coaching focuses on “how” something can happen in the present and future.